Being able to speak what you need is something you start learning from the time you’re born. Are you hungry? Cry a little bit and get a bottle. As the years go by, the voice becomes the important communication tool. Our skills are refined with age and practice, and by the time we are adults and pursue our careers, we are able to distinctively voice what it is we want out of life.

However, not many of us have the capabilities to convincingly convey our wants and needs through communication skills. Further practice in the development of your communications skills is imperative in areas like business. It doesn’t matter if you’re a small business owner or in charge of a multinational conglomerate, the ability to effectively communicate is crucial. The main idea is to convey your message in the best possible way, hopefully generating a proactive response.

Effective CommunicationWhether you’re speaking to individuals or large groups, the art of communication is important; and not solely vocal communication skills – although they’re most used – written and electronic communication is also very important in the business world. For starters, you need to grasp what communication at this level actual is before you can hope to improve on it.

Communication, through written words, non-verbal actions and spoken words, is the mechanism used to establish and modify relationships. In order to improve on your skills and help create more business opportunities, you have to start by bringing a better attitude to the conversation. You should manifest constructive attitudes and be honest, optimistic and patient with people who aren’t necessarily on the same page.

Although conveying your point is important, the “listening” aspect of communicating is equally as important. If you’re speaking or being spoken to, make eye contact with the person/people involved in the conversation. You don’t have to stare directly at them for extended periods, but eye contact shows that your attention isn’t wavering. This then encourages people and shows them that you’re a trustworthy person who listens.

Being essentially personable is a great way to enhance your skills and excel in the business world. Oh, the dreaded body language! You should always be aware of your posture while speaking, especially if promoting business ideas to interested parties. Your eyes and voice can be strong, but if your body language is telling a different story, that’s the one that the audience is going to hear.

Make sure that you’re not carrying a posture that will read as if you’re uninterested; this goes for speaking and listening to others. Be in command of your body during conversations. Never mince words and always say what you mean and mean what you say. It’s important that a communicator comes across as confident, but it’s even more important that they come across as commanding.

If you don’t sound like you believe in your proposed business venture, who else is going to? Your tone and confidence in yourself can sell ideas to even the harshest of critics. Always have a belief in the things you bring to the table and the courage to say them. Lastly, remember that practice makes perfect. Good communication skills don’t happen overnight. You have to implement the principles of good communication if you expect good things to happen.

For more info call us at 1800-102-1345 (Toll Free) or visit us at our communication skills training page.

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People often ask me for tips on how to give “negative feedback”—which is something that apparently no one enjoys either giving or receiving. Constructive feedback, on the other hand, which is feedback that helps people grow and improve, is on everyone’s most wanted list. So what’s the difference between negative feedback and constructive feedback? The challenge you face when you give someone this helpful feedback is to speak in a way that allows people to hear and understand your message without causing them to become defensive, resistant, or emotional.

Some people advocate a “rip off the Band-Aid” approach to providing feedback. This approach can be traumatic—it hurts the receiver and causes more avoidance and denial every time it happens.

how to give feedback

Other people promote the “feedback sandwich” approach in which you sandwich the negative message between a positive message up front and another positive message at the end of the conversation. This approach feels like manipulation, and recipients learn to discount the positive feedback that begins and ends the exchange—even if it is authentic. The initial positive statement acts as a setup for the negativity of the real message that is to follow.

Here are a number of tips that will help you improve the quality of your constructive feedback conversations—and increase the likelihood that your feedback will produce the desired results;

1.Clarify your “come from”:

When you provide constructive feedback, your attitude and thought process must come from a space of help and support. Most people are painfully aware when they have performed poorly, and approaching a person with an attitude of frustration or anger will do more harm than good, both to the person and to the relationship. People instinctively shut down when they are approached with negativity and strong emotion. Approach the conversation clearly from the perspective of helping the individual grow and develop. Your positive approach will set a positive tone for the entire conversation.

 2. Identify the facts:

To provide clear and helpful feedback about an individual’s performance, you have to know exactly what happened and the consequences that followed from their behavior. If you do not have concrete examples of what a person did, it will be difficult for him or her to know what to improve upon or change. When your feedback is vague, you run the risk of speaking in broad generalities or personal interpretations. No one knows what to do without specifics.

3.Move the person forward:

When we provide feedback, we have a tendency to ask questions that force people to defend themselves, such as “Why did you do that?” A far more effective approach is to ask questions that stimulate thinking and help the person move forward into the future: “What would you do differently next time to improve your results?” This question allows the person to look at what they did, learn from the outcome, and think about what they need to change to improve their results.

4. Build accountability

The objective in a feedback conversation is to establish a clear and specific plan to improve performance or change behavior. Having a clear-cut plan in mind before holding the conversation is a good start, but don’t be surprised if you learn something that will change your original plan during the course of the conversation. If the individual finds it difficult to create a plan that will improve their results, you may have to step in and help them build the plan. If you step in, be sure that you explain why you are asking them to follow a particular course of action.

5. Don’t assume anything DialogueWORKS logo

We generally assume that we have been understood, or that we understand why someone behaved in a certain way. We also assume that once we have given clear directions, the problem will not occur again. Identify your own assumptions and challenge them by asking yourself or the other person a series of questions. Listen carefully to the answers to those questions, for they will let you know whether or not you have been clearly understood.

6. Assess the quality of your relationship

If the other person knows that you care about them, they will interpret what you say as a reflection of the importance your relationship. Everyone finds it gratifying to know that the people they work for appreciate the contributions they make. If the only time you ever speak to a person is when they have done something wrong, you are missing a huge opportunity. Make time to mention the good things that people do and celebrate their successes. This will improve the quality of your relationship, and also increase their commitment to achieve results.

7. Express your support

People want to know that you have their back. They want to know that they can come to you when they have questions, concerns, or challenges. If you are approachable and continue to reinforce your desire to help them succeed, you will increase the degree of openness and collaboration that is invested in achieving results.

The purpose of feedback is to improve performance and achieve desired results. People want to be successful in what they do, and very few people, if any, intentionally go out of their way to perform poorly. As a leader, manager, parent, or spouse you should recognize that you have a huge impact on how people perform and the satisfaction of that journey. Improving your ability to provide constructive feedback will pay huge dividends.

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Learn how to improve Business Results through effective and improved dialogue skills. Then join our DialogueWORKS certification training program!

DialogueWORKS Certification
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This course addresses the dialogue skills that are so critical to individual and organizational results

DialogueWORKS CertificationThrough this program you will learn how to :

  • Learn the four essential dialogue skills for holding any difficult conversation.
  • Assess your conversational strengths and weaknesses.
  • Recognize the source of inaccurate thinking, which drives blame, self-justification, and lack of accountability.
  • Identify your erroneous personal assumptions.
  • Clarify intent to create more focused execution, outcomes, and intended results.
  • Learn to recognize and defuse the source of “hot” or emotional reactions by uncovering individuals’ perceptions of violated values.
  • Learn and apply a simple conversational framework for providing feedback that builds effective solutions, improves performance, and increases accountability.

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We often hear this question: “How do you get accountability to stick?” Or this longer version: “We’ve tried repeatedly over the years to get our people to take more accountability for their behavior and results, but we haven’t been able to make it stick—how do you make it sticky?”

Of course, there are a number of critical success factors when it comes to making accountability stick—such as a common language and framework for discussing accountability, a crystal clear definition of desired results, personal choice and commitment, positive rather than negative applications of accountability, proven implementation tools and skills, and determined follow-up—but the secret to making accountability “sticky” is integration. Taking accountability has to become part of the DNA of your leaders, your people, and your entire organization. It needs to be woven continuously into daily activities.

cultural accountabilityIt was for this very reason and purpose that we developed the simple, basic, and easy-to-implement Steps To Accountability—See It, Own It, Solve It, Do It—including cogent descriptions of Above The Line and Below The Line behavior and attitudes. This is the central model of the book The Oz Principle and the primary vehicle or method for making accountability stick in individuals and organizations.

When people in an organization begin using the language of Above The Line, Below The Line, See It, Own It, Solve It, and Do It on a daily basis, they start building a common awareness and commitment around staying Above The Line and Seeing It, Owning It, Solving It, and Doing It.

What emerges from such awareness and commitment is a whole new approach to work and results. People begin monitoring and correcting themselves while encouraging and helping others to stay Above The Line in order to achieve the desired results. Consequently, accountability becomes internalized in every individual and integrated into every activity.

When people begin weaving Above The Line, Below The Line, and See It, Own It, Solve It, Do It language into their daily work activities, they take a crucial first step toward building a Culture of Accountability and creating a work environment where accountability sticks.

For more information on making accountability stick and Creating a Culture of Accountability, we invite you to join the Accountability Community at www.ozprinciple.com, where you can review actual client case studies.

Steps To Accountability, See It, Own It, Solve, It, Do It, Above The Line, Below The Line, Culture of Accountability, Creating A Culture Of Accountability, and Accountability Community are all registered trademarks of Partners In Leadership, Inc.

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All of us at one time or another have had the opportunity to work with or for someone that we would label as a jerk, idiot, or moron.  And we have all probably been a jerk at some point to those with whom we associate.

Do you know people that display the characteristics listed below? Are you guilty of any of these behaviors yourself? If so, what do you think is the payoff for behaving in such a manner?  After all, we behave the way we do if we perceive that there is something we can get for doing so.  I hope thinking about these behaviors will provide a degree of mental preparation and readiness that will assist you with your next difficult encounter.

The Interrogator:

These individuals ask questions for the sake of asking questions, not because they want to learn anything.  They are often trying to challenge people’s intelligence or make them look unprepared or inept in front of others.  Sometimes their questions feel like a frontal assault. They may ask a number of questions and never give the person an opportunity to answer.

jerk placeWhat to Do:

Be prepared with facts and data.  Sometimes these individuals don’t want to accept what they are hearing or are trying to elevate themselves in some way.  If you can support or substantiate your statements with evidence, they will find it more difficult to discredit you.

If you are dealing with a barrage of questions, you can slow this interaction down by turning the tables and asking them questions.  For example, you might try some of these:

“What specifically do you want to know?”

“Could you give me an example of what you meant by ‘unprepared?’”

“What do you want to know by asking these questions?”

Sometimes answering a question with a question will force the other person to think about what is most important rather than using questions as a means of making a point.

The Intimidator:

These folks often have a very abrasive style.  They are rough around the edges and are often accused of being too direct, cold, and blunt.  They also don’t hesitate to “dress down” or confront an individual in front of others.  They may also just blurt out “unfiltered” thinking or criticism without concern for others. People who use this style of communication become angry if they don’t get what they want, or if people don’t keep their commitments.

What to Do:

Don’t take these people personally if they confront you about something.  Remember, behind the emotion is a value they feel has been violated.  Ask questions to help them move from a place of irrational reaction to discover the issue behind their emotional outburst.  Remain calm and don’t be drawn in by reacting to their attack. If it’s not possible to excuse yourself from the situation, let them vent and make plans to talk at a later time when they have calmed down and are more rational.  If there is a high level of trust between you and this person, and the timing is right, you may be able to talk with this person about their behavior.

The Micromanager:

We’ve all known people who have a hard time delegating tasks to other people.  Because they want to guarantee success, they constantly check up on people or may even do the work for them.  Those working with these types of managers are often frustrated and feel that the manager doesn’t trust them to do their job.

What to Do:

Formulate a specific plan for completing the task with checklists and timelines.  Identify your goals and the options you have chosen to achieve the goals.  Seek their approval and take action.  Check in frequently and regularly to report results.  Ask for clarification and specifics of anything they are asking you to do.

As a river guide, I found that I could increase my credibility and the amount of tips offered at the end of the trip by telling my clients what I would do, doing it, and then telling them what I did. These tactics will increase their confidence in you while reassuring them that you can deliver great results and follow through on your commitments.

The Blamer:

One of my first managers in business was a blamer.  She blamed me when I did what she asked and things didn’t turn out as she had hoped.  She blamed me when things went well because she thought I could have achieved more.

Unfortunately, some managers often blame others to avoid responsibility and to escape the spotlight being shined on their poor performance.

What to Do:

Make a plan that your boss agrees to.  Document it and get it in writing.  When customer demands change the priorities and the plan, get that in writing.  Don’t assume anything and ask questions to clarify.  Be sure and document any changes that are made.  This can help interrupt the blame cycle when things don’t go as planned.

Workplace or Jerkplace

The Sycophant:

This individual goes out of their way to praise powerful people to get their support and approval.  Their relationships with higher-ups afford them a high degree of protection from the consequences of their poor performance or bad behavior.  They usually offer false praise to those who work for them as a strategy for manipulating others to achieve their goals.

What to Do:

You need to document the consequences and outcomes of their behavior if you expect to be believed.  Often the reason these people offer praise is because they seek praise themselves.  Look for opportunities to express sincere praise that adds value for the good things they do.  Don’t believe everything they tell you.  These individuals are often highly negative or critical of others while seemingly praising you.  Because such behavior is self-serving, you don’t want to get caught up in speaking negatively about others, ever.

There are numerous behaviors that you might find offensive as you work with others. Taking a moment to notice what is happening in your dealings with them and then carefully planning a strategy to handle such difficult people will improve the quality of your interactions as you work to build a career and deliver optimal results.

Re-blogged From

DialogueWORKS

About The Author: –
John, president of DialogueWORKS

has over 20 years of consulting and training experience in a variety of industries. John holds graduate degrees in both law and organizational behavior. He has designed and developed courses for numerous Fortune 500 companies, assembling content and tailoring it to meet each client’s specific needs.

For more information you can call us at 1800-102-1345(Toll Free) or visit us at DialogueWORKS India

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Become a certified DialogueWORKS® trainer

Recognize and Discover the Importance of an Effective Business Dialogue

Dialogue Works

Understanding the differences in individual styles allows us to communicate and connect in a way that enhances mutual understanding and respect. Learning to recognize style differences will help you connect and engage with others in ways you may never have thought possible.

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Simply acknowledging reality and owning circumstances will accomplish little if you fail to solve problems and remove obstacles on your road to achieving the results you want. Once you See It and Own It, you must Solve It by constantly asking “What else can I do to achieve the desired results?” Only then can you consistently Do It!

You can translate your acknowledgment of reality and your ownership of circumstances into real problem solving action by implementing a simple set of key Solve It skills:

  1. Stay Engaged: Don’t focus on what can’t be done, continue looking for and thinking about creative alternatives.
  2. Persist: You can never ever stop asking the Solve It question “What else can I do?”
  3. Think Differently: Remember, the same thinking that got you into a problem won’t get you out of it.
  4. Create New Linkages: New approaches usually involve forging new relationships.
  5. Take the Initiative: Who do you want to be? Someone who makes things happen? someone who watches things happen? someone who wonders what happened? someone who never knew anything happened?
  6. Stay Conscious: Challenge current assumptions and beliefs to break through to new levels of thinking that will probably take you out of your comfort zone.

Here’s one company’s experience with Solve It. A large financial services company was struggling to improve the performance of its call centers. Turnover was high, “handle time” was long, and software solutions were inadequate. Targets for improvement were established and everyone began asking “What else can I do?” However, when it came to bringing about real change, the going got tougher as numerous unexpected issues and problems arose. Undaunted, everyone in the organization continued asking “What else can I do?” to find new ways to improve performance. Ideas poured in from everywhere as everyone from senior management to telephone operators took accountability for reducing the time needed to handle a call.

Within a few months, they changed the way they hired people, they implemented new software solutions, they began measuring and reporting performance on a daily basis, they implemented a balanced scorecard, and they focused their training and development on high priority skills. Their Solve It mentality flourished, leading to a new set of Solve It skills. The result was a whopping $143 million per year increase in net operating income, a large portion of which was attributable to improvements in the call centers.

To learn more about developing crucial Solve It skills, we invite you to join the Accountability Community where you can review the case studies of clients that See It, Own It, Solve It, and Do It.

See It, Own It, Solve It, Do It, and Accountability Community are all registered trademarks of Partners In Leadership, Inc.

Customer centric selling is a selling process that seeks to sell products to the customer with the aim of ensuring that the interests of the buyer are prioritized. Unlike the traditional approach, this selling process seeks to form long-term relationships between the buyer and the seller by turning the seller into a partner rather than a tormentor.

Customer Centric Selling

However, it does not seek to overhaul or do away with traditional sales values and tactics. Instead, it seeks to make those values adapt to changing consumer patterns and increased scrutiny from government regulations.

Conversations vs. Presentations

Traditional selling needs that you just keep company with a script in your head and present it to anyone who cares to listen. Though this worked for a while and still works, customer centric selling tries to replace this with situational conversations. This means that the seller tries to give this person something that is relevant to a situation that is around them.

Features vs. Benefits

Nowadays, people are more interested about their needs than in the past. For this reason, they seek to relate what the product can do to what they need to be done. This means that instead of telling this person that the laptop weighs only three ounce, you tell that person that the laptop is light and portable. This means that you as a salesperson need to highlight the benefits of the product and how it will help that buyer.

Bottom-up Approach

Another feature about customer-centric sales strategy is that unlike traditional marketing where the salespersons were seen as a group that needs to be managed, effective selling requires that managers rely on feedback from the salesperson to the managing because it is the salespeople who understand the real difficulties of selling the product based on with their challenges, and therefore, the need for adjusting your product to suit the buyer and not the other way round.

Questions

Another unique thing about the customer centric selling approach is that the seller makes an effort in trying to ask the buyer questions so as to get feedback’s. Here, the seller has not just gone out to recite a couple of features about the product and then give them to a disinterested listener. The seller seeks to show the buyer that he is actually willing to listen to the buyer and then gives him what will be the best. So many people have been able to get valuable information from prospects even though they may not have bought the product, but provided valuable insight as to why the product was not selling in the first place.

As the name suggests, it is important to note that this model for selling is rather new and if you are planning to introduce it to your organization, you may face some stiff resistance to those who are used to the old way of doing things. However, once you try implementing it, you will realize that the benefits of this system far outweigh the challenges.

For more information about customer centric selling call us at 1800-102-1345 (Toll Free) or visit us at http://www.doortraining.co.in

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Become a certified DialogueWORKS® trainer

Learn how to manage your emotional energy and other aspects of holding successful dialogues through DialogueWORKS®

DialogueWORKS TrainingDialogueWORKS effectively teaches how to spot communication behaviors and tendencies that sabotage attempts to establish dialogue and more important, demonstrates precisely what can be done about them! Learn to increase the ability to use all the skills of effective conversation to increase personal and professional results. An individual’s ability to hold the tough conversations without destroying relationship is the key to getting results.

The powerful Dialogue Works training will enable you to:

•    Hold conversations that achieve REAL results.
•    Resolve conflict in a way that promotes cooperation.
•    Solicit and deliver feedback that improves execution and accountability. Create messages that are powerful and convincing.

For more information about DialogueWORKS training program click here

Who Should Attend?

If you would like to improve your awareness of the dynamics of REAL conversations, and overview the Collaborating for Results® course content, then you or your nominee would benefit from attending an Executive Preview! *

*Certification only for in-house corporate trainers.

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This is a question I have contemplated for a long time. Recently my exploration became more focused because of a challenge that occurred in our office.

As I was getting on a plane to fly east, a client I was traveling to visit, informed me that the training materials we had shipped two weeks earlier had never arrived. I immediately emailed my assistant to alert her and asked her to reach out to the client to remedy the situation.

When I arrived in New York, I was picked up by a car service. En route to Connecticut, I texted my assistant to check on the situation. She assured me that FedEx confirmed that the materials had been delivered. Meanwhile, the client sent me numerous emails during the day claiming that the materials had in fact not been delivered. I asked my assistant whether she had called the client during the day. No, she responded, she had not–because she did not have my direct contact’s number. I was dumbfounded by her inaction. After all, she has access to all of my email accounts.  All she had to do is open my email, find the contact’s number, and call him. Unfortunately she did not take the initiative to do as I had hoped she would.

initiative at workLuckily, the limo driver was a retired Pitney Bowes executive. He asked me if I knew the town and zip code where we had sent our package. After I told him, he said that the client had given us the wrong zip code. Sure enough, he was right!  With that information, we were able to track down the materials and get them to the client in time for the training.

Although we were able to resolve the issue, it could have been avoided. Once I got home, I had the opportunity to hold a REAL conversation with my assistant about what happened and what prevented her from taking the initiative in solving the problem at the time.

In talking with other executives and colleagues, I have found that they often experience similar issues in their organizations. This is what I have discovered about why people fail to take initiative:

Bounded Rationality

This is another way of saying that people do not see past what they know. In other words, when a situation comes up that is entirely outside that person’s experience or expertise–and it is something that they have never even stopped to consider–then that person will have a hard time even perceiving what’s going on. We can be functionally blinded by our own expertise and experience. When our rationality is bounded, we might find it easier to ignore the problem and hope it will just go away.

Lack of Capability

When confronted with a task or situation entirely outside their experience or expertise, people lack the knowledge to do what is asked. They just don’t know how, and they might not even know what questions to ask in order to begin to grasp what is required. They may not understand the directions they are given. Or they might not be willing to run the risk of being perceived as stupid or inept, so they do not dare to ask clarifying questions that might reveal their ignorance or ineptitude. They say nothing and complete the task incorrectly or not at all.

Sometimes when people are asked to do something they have never done before, they feel like they are being asked to walk out of the light and into the darkness of the unknown. This is an uncomfortable place to be, especially if they believe there are negative consequences for a wrong decision or action.

Management “Search and Rescue”

You may be surprised to learn that for some people, simple inaction seems to be a viable strategy. These people indicated that in their experience, if they do nothing, then someone else (usually a manager) will step in and do it for them. Managers, take note that this style of “rescue management” teaches people that they don’t need to be accountable, while itrobs them of the experience of learning from their mistakes. Those whom you rescue in this way do not learn to think critically or develop viable solutions to their challenges. They simply assume someone else will pick up the slack.

Recently I was trying to help one of my children develop some critical thinking skills. He replied, rather agitatedly, “Dad, cut out all these questions and just tell me what I am supposed to do!” As leaders or parents, we are often sorely tempted to bail them out. And we usually do. But we should realize that in the long run, we are not doing the people we rescue any favors.

Execution over Innovation

Some people are so task-driven that they are more concerned about working through their list of to-do’s than about taking on a new task that may have no clear path to solution. Their list has become more important than the skill of figuring out a new solution.

Task Overload

Others have so much on their plate that they simply cannot process one more assignment. These overworked people will often shut down or refuse to take on anything else, keeping solely to the tasks they have been assigned. Unfortunately, they often do this without telling anyone about their overload, so the challenge or the new assignment goes unaddressed.

Ignorance by Convenience

Shades of this dynamic may be present in all of the other dynamics as well. I have heard people say that found “not knowing” to be quite convenient. “Ignorance is bliss,” they say. In other words, I can’t be held accountable for what I don’t know how to do or what I simply don’t do. These “ignorant” folks actually go so far as to say that they would rather accept the consequences for failing to act at all, rather than face the consequences of doing the wrong thing.

Obviously, all of these responses are nothing more than excuses people make to rationalize their failure to act. If you expect your people to take initiative, you need to:

(1) clearly outline your expectations

(2) assess their ability to perform what is asked.

(3) Consider the person’s current workload

(4) stress the priority of what you are asking over their normal tasks, if that is appropriate.

(5) Take time to coach, teach, and mentor individuals who are uneasy about taking on responsibilities outside their area of expertise–you may need to encourage people to think independently to solve problems as they arise.

(6) Finally, be willing to let people learn from their mistakes and wildly celebrate their successes.

How have you been able to encourage others to take the initiative? What worked well? What didn’t work?

About Author: –
John, president of DialogueWORKS

has over 20 years of consulting and training experience in a variety of industries. John holds graduate degrees in both law and organizational behavior. He has designed and developed courses for numerous Fortune 500 companies, assembling content and tailoring it to meet each client’s specific needs.

For more information you can call us at 1800-102-1345(Toll Free) or visit us at DialogueWORKS India

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When we look at the statistics we have about the performance our own organizations, what we can all too easily overlook is that there are three measures we can use, so we have to decide which one is most relevant to our situation, or whether we could learn more by looking at all three.

Performance Measure factorsThe three measures are: Efficiency, Economy, and Effectiveness. Let us look at each in turn.

1. Efficiency: — is the one we tend to be most familiar with, especially if we come from a technical background. It measures the relationship between inputs and output. We might measure inputs in terms of cost or by some physical measure, such as materials or man-hours. Similarly we might measure outputs in terms of sales income or numbers of items produced. It obviously better to achieve a higher output for less cost so we always want to keep an eye on this relationship to see if it is changing, and in which direction. However, when we look at the other two E’s we may see why we need to avoid becoming too obsessed with efficiency. There is the risk of failing to see wood for trees.

2. Economy: – is about overall costs and revenues. It takes into account the way a change in one cost or benefit can have effects on others, so that an improvement in efficiency in one area might lead to higher costs elsewhere. You could improve efficiency in a way which put too much pressure on employees leading to higher absenteeism and faster staff turnover and therefore higher total costs.

3. Effectiveness: — is about achieving your objectives. It is especially important in the Public Sector and the Third Sector, where the aim is to provide a service rather than to make a profit. An efficient and economical system which failed to achieve your principal objective would not be a success. Even if you are in the Private Sector, you might find it worthwhile looking at Effectiveness as well as the other E’s as annual profits may need to be balanced against long term growth or market share.

In many industries, such as electricity or health services, you might be providing a service to the public even if you are in the Private Sector, and you might not be in business long if it becomes apparent that you are making profits without providing a satisfactory service.

Obviously, there are many cases where all three measures point in the same direction. A badly managed business will fail by all three measures, and any sensible improvement to working methods is likely to result in a better performance no matter which one you look at. There are, however, many cases where the three measures give contradictory results. This is where common sense or management ability becomes important. Relying on the wrong measure can seriously damage your business.

Are You Using All The Three E’s of Management To Measure The Performance Of Your Business?

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About Us: – We (DOOR Training and Consulting India) are dedicated to and passionate about improving the performance and effectiveness of individuals, leaders, teams and organizations. We provide smart training and consulting solutions in the areas of leadership, sales and sales management, customer service and soft skills training such as communication and negotiation and beyond.

For more information call us at 1800-102-1345 (Toll Free) and visit us at http://www.doortraining.co.in

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